Angelo Faticoni: A Man They Could Not Drown

Angelo Faticoni portrait

Angelo Faticoni (1859-1931) was a professional stunt artist who performed a number of impressive feats of buoyancy such as staying afloat in the water for fifteen hours despite having a twenty pounds of lead tied to his ankle and swimming across the Hudson River tied to a chair (and the chair was weighted with lead). This earned him the nickname “The Human Cork”. He discovered that he could easily float in the water for long periods of time during his childhood. However, he didn’t use his odd ability professionally until his later years.

Angelo Faticoni.jpg

Faticoni was an enigma. There were several speculations on how he could perform those stunts. Some said that his body composition must be different from the average humans while others surmised that he had some kind of supernatural power. The psychics at the time thought that he was somehow helped by the spirits in keeping him afloat. The medical community was baffled and unable to come up with a conclusive explanation. Faticoni had promised to reveal the secret of his stunt, but he passed away before he was able to do so. He died on August 2, 1931, at the age of 72.

The following is an obituary of Faticoni published in New York Herald Tribune, Aug. 13, 1931:

Faticoni could sleep in water, roll up into a ball, lie on his side, or assume any position asked of him. Once he was sewn into a bag and then thrown headforemost into the water, with a twenty-pound cannonball lashed to his legs. His head reappeared on the surface soon afterward, and he remained motionless in that position for eight hours. Another time he swam across the Hudson tied to a chair weighted with lead. Some years ago he went to Harvard to perform for the students and faculty. He had been examined by medical authorities who failed to find support for their theory that he was able to float at such great lengths by the nature of his internal organs, which they believed were different from those of most men. Faticoni had often promised to reveal the secret of how he became ‘The Human Cork,’ but he never did.

About Edmark M. Law

My name Edmark M. Law. I work as a freelance writer, mainly writing about science and mathematics. I am an ardent hobbyist. I like to read, solve puzzles, play chess, make origami and play basketball. In addition, I dabble in magic, particularly card magic and other sleight-of-hand type magic. I live in Hong Kong. I blog at learnfunfacts.com. You can find me on Twitter @EdmarkMLaw and Facebook. My email is learnfunfacts@gmail.com
This entry was posted in Oddities and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

16 Responses to Angelo Faticoni: A Man They Could Not Drown

  1. Vera says:

    Amazing man. How sad he died before revealing his secret

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Garfield Hug says:

    I second what Ady said! Amaaazing!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. An enigma bobbing through time, wrapped in mystery….

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Incredible! Quite a gift to have, though sadly not invincible

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Rebel Girl says:

    I wish we could find out how he did it. Interesting story, thanks for sharing it.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Oooh if only he were here to give David Blaine a run for his money lol

    Liked by 2 people

  7. willo says:

    They couldn’t drown him, but the Lead Poisoning… !
    🙂
    Can’t help but wonder if it wasn’t a long con that never played out. Perhaps he was waiting for the day when a sponsor of a demonstration would use GOLD to really
    test his mettle. Then he could “fail,” making off stealthily with a fortune and faking his own demise!
    Unless some clever chemist brought equally dense Tungsten and spoiled everything.
    https://www.popsci.com/diy/article/2008-03/how-make-convincing-fake-gold-bars
    Thanks! I’ve enjoyed this round of silly conjecture! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s