Truce in the Trenches: The Christmas Truce of 1914

This is a guest post by Souptik Banerjee. During the First World War in 1914, French, German, and British soldiers crossed trenches to exchange seasonal greetings and talk. In some areas, men from both sides ventured into no man’s land on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day to mingle and exchange food and souvenirs. The truces […]

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Nine Incredible Facts About Cats

This is a guest post by Daniel Richardson. The everyday domestic cat is anything but everyday and domestic when you scratch beneath the surface of their history. Their demise was instrumental in the spread of the black plague in Europe and their relationship with the Egyptians has left a mark on history. Cats have held special […]

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12 Fun Facts About “The Twelve Days of Christmas”

1. The Origin of the Song The origin of “The Twelve Days of Christmas” is ambiguous. Evidence suggests that it originated from France and three French versions are known. The earliest English version appeared in a 1780 book titled Mirth Without Mischief under the heading “The Twelve Days of Christmas sung at King Pepin’s Ball”. […]

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Ernest Hemingway’s Blood and Money

In 1918, shortly before the culmination of the First World War, writer Ernest Hemingway was wounded by an Austrian mortar which exploded near him at Fossalta di Piave. He was a Red Cross ambulance driver at the time. Around thirty years later, Hemingway revisited the same spot during his trip to Venice. Initially, he wanted […]

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The Most Protected Artifacts Across the Globe

This is a guest post by John Hannen. Covering everything from intricate collections of jewels to fine pieces of art, humanity has certainly gathered together a remarkable range of precious items over history. As these items have an immense value and high insurance costs attached to them though, you may find yourself pondering how these […]

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Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Minor Investment

Franklin D. Roosevelt (left) and Jesse H. Jones (right) In 1940, Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a memorandum titled “F.D.R. miscellany (memorandum in F.D.R.L.)” to his Federal Loan Administrator Jesse H. Jones regarding a minor investment — in horse racing: Reference Elliot Roosevelt (Editor) (1950). F.D.R: His Personal Letters 1928-1945.  

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A Complaint Letter From Ancient Babylonia

A tablet unearthed in 1953 contained what could be one of the oldest complaints letters. It is estimated that the letter was written in 1750 BC. So, it can be said that people have been writing complaint letters at least 3750 years ago. The tablet is now displayed in the British Museum.

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Gleanings From The Past #63

Numerical Coincidence I have heard of certain individuals being regulated in all the important events of their lives by certain peculiar numbers, which fell out to them respectively, with a strangeness of accuracy which it is almost impossible to reckon altogether the effect of chance. The following account, which is taken from the work of an Arabian historian, affords […]

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Gleanings From The Past #62

Bag o’ Nails BACCHANALS—BACCHANALIANS — vulgo “The Bag o’ Nails.” A public-house in Pimlico had originally a sign on which was represented a satyr and several Bacchanalians dancing and carousing. The common people called the satyr the devil, and, in course of time, the sign was known only as “The Bag o’ Nails,” or “The […]

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Obsolete Geographical Knowledge

“You mean there are two Koreas?” — U.S. Ambassador to Singapore Richard Kneip, when questioned about his opinion during a congressional hearing on the conflict between the North and South Korea. Doctor, a newspaper targeted to general practitioners published once a week, was well received by the doctors due to its excellent content and service. […]

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