Lewis Carroll’s “Double Acrostic” Poem

On May 20, 1871, Lewis Carroll sent the following poem to Mabel and Emily Kerr of Canada. The poem was titled “Double Acrostic”. Can you figure out where the acrostics are? Thanks, thanks, fair Cousins, for your gift So swiftly borne to Albion’s isle — Though angry waves their crests uplift Between our shores, for […]

Read More

A Contrived Math In Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of the Snark

In Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of the Snark, the Butcher wanted to convince the Beaver that two plus one is equal to three, and he did it the “easy” way: Taking Three as the subject to reason about — A convenient number to state — We add Seven, and Ten, and then multiply out By One Thousand […]

Read More

Lewis Carroll’s Curious Square Poem

The following is a curious “square poem” attributed to Lewis Carroll: I often wondered when I cursed, Often feared where I would be— Wondered where she’d yield her love, When I yield, so will she. I would her will be pitied! Cursed be love! She pitied me …

Read More

Lewis Carroll’s Weird Sylogisms

A syllogism is a form of logical argument in which a conclusion is drawn from two or more premises that are assumed to be true using deductive reasoning. For instance, 1. All men are mortal. 2. Socrates is a man. Therefore Socrates is mortal.

Read More