“This Is Trivial” (Or Is It?)

There was a popular anecdote about mathematician G. H. Hardy (1877 – 1947) that goes like this: While conducting a lecture on Number Theory, he said that a certain mathematical notion was trivial. But after a little while, he hesitated and asked, “Is it trivial?” He then excused himself and went to his office. After […]

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Mathematicians And Demagogues

Here’s a little wordplay I came up with: There’s nothing special about it though a few people who heard it though that it’s amusing.

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The Locked Boxes Paradox

Imagine an infinite row of boxes, each unlocked, each with a key in its lock. At time , lock Box 1 and put its key into Box 2. At time , lock Box 2 and put its key into Box 3. . . . At time , lock Box  and put its key into Box […]

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Less Is More: A Poetic Paradox

Image: NASA In his Paradoxes in Probability Theory and Mathematical Statistics (1986), Gábor J. Székely shared a paradox learned from his professor, Alfréd Rényi: Since I started to deal with information theory I have often meditated upon the conciseness of poems; how can a single line of verse contain far more ‘information’ than a highly […]

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Strange Subtraction

I took 1 from 19 and I got 20. How was that possible? . . . . Solution (Click to Show) It’s in Roman numeral. So, taking away I (1) from XIX (19) leaves me with XX (20).

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11 Awesome Facts About Mathematics That Will Blow Your Mind

The is a guest post by Prince Kapoor. You will always find mathematics at the base of any and all fields related to technology and science. Some of the biggest mysteries of the universe such as the big bang theory and black holes can be solved by using mathematics. For some people, the thought of […]

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Communicating a Proof

Saunders Mac Lane (1909 – 2005) was an American mathematician who became known for being one of the proponents of category theory. During an interview with The Mathematical Review in 1976, he reminisced about the time when he was learning about geometry in high school: I recall one occasion involving a theorem about a triangle: I knew […]

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Gleanings from the Past #75

Coining New Words Carl Sagan Physicists had to invent words and phrases for concepts far removed from everyday experience. It was their fashion to avoid pure neologisms and instead to evoke, even if feebly, some analogous commonplace. The alternative was to name discoveries and equations after one another. This they did also. But if you […]

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Another Match Equation Puzzle

Here’s another match equation puzzle. The illustration represents an incorrect Roman numerals equation (3 = 30). Move only two matches to make this equation valid. You cannot shift the position of the other matches. Solution (Click to Show) The solution involves Roman numerals and a multiplication sign. So, it can be read as: C = […]

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A Mathematical Proposal

There is a quaint story in Ripley’s Believe It or Not! 15th Series (1969) about a man who used mathematical terms to propose. Robert Greer, a mathematics teacher at the Mount School in York, England, made the following proposal to a girl named Anne in 1880: If R = 1/2 and A = 1/2, Then R + […]

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