Peculiar Symbols in the Looking Glass

One day, when Alice entered the looking, she noticed a sign depicting a peculiar group of symbols: “What are those symbols?” Alice mused. “They seem to be some sort of secret code or a foreign alphabet.” After some time, Alice realized the real meaning of the symbols. “It’s a sequence with a pattern!” Alice exclaimed. […]

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A Hamster Playing Super Mario Bros.

This one is amusing. A Japanese Youtuber “yutako55” shared a video about a hamster “playing” Super Mario Bros.: The hamster managed to finish World 1-1. I’m not sure how well it would fare in subsequent levels. Nonetheless, Bowser must prepare!

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Truce in the Trenches: The Christmas Truce of 1914

This is a guest post by Souptik Banerjee. During the First World War in 1914, French, German, and British soldiers crossed trenches to exchange seasonal greetings and talk. In some areas, men from both sides ventured into no man’s land on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day to mingle and exchange food and souvenirs. The truces […]

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Ernest Hemingway’s Blood and Money

In 1918, shortly before the culmination of the First World War, writer Ernest Hemingway was wounded by an Austrian mortar which exploded near him at Fossalta di Piave. He was a Red Cross ambulance driver at the time. Around thirty years later, Hemingway revisited the same spot during his trip to Venice. Initially, he wanted […]

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An Ingenious Hiding Technique

  A friend emailed me this amusing video earlier: It’s a “tutorial” on how to escape police using a duct tube. The premise may sound silly, but the execution of the trick is clever.

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Gleanings From The Past #60

Diplomacy Lord Wentworth gave some very cavalier advice to one going upon a diplomatic mission : he was up to the system of courts, or he would not have committed himself by such a satire. ” To secure yourself, and serve your country, you must at all times, and upon all occasions, speak the truth; […]

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A Victim Of His Own Invention

Sir Robert Watson-Watt was a Scottish physicist and a proponent of radio direction finding and radar technology. His ideas were credited for the defeat of more than a quarter of German U-boats and subsequently enabled the Royal Air Force to win the Battle of Britain in 1941. Several years later, he was pulled over by […]

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A Psychic’s Lost Cat

The note above was found by someone named Richard near the corner of Broome Street and Broadway in Manhattan, New York. He said that he also found five to six more of this note posted in the area, but none of them provided any contact information. Upon further examination, he learned that the notes were […]

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Not Lost In Translation: A Curious Language Anecdote

Vladimir Nabokov Vladimir Nabokov, in his 1962 novel Pale Fire, related a remarkable, albeit probably apocryphal, Russian language anecdote. The story went that a newspaper which covered the coronation ceremony of a Tsar “accidentally” misprinted “корона” (korona) (crown) as “ворона” (vorona) (crow). The following day, the newspaper apologized for the error and promptly “corrected” it. However, the word […]

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A Tombstone Reference

In New Orleans’ Metairie Cemetery, there’s a tombstone with a strange inscription. It wasn’t a witty verse or even an inspirational quote. Instead, it only contained this odd line, “See Louisiana Reports, 1905, Page 39.” The tomb belongs to a lady who was lost at sea, but the Louisiana Supreme Court instructed her will executors […]

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