A Victim Of His Own Invention

Sir Robert Watson-Watt was a Scottish physicist and a proponent of radio direction finding and radar technology. His ideas were credited for the defeat of more than a quarter of German U-boats and subsequently enabled the Royal Air Force to win the Battle of Britain in 1941. Several years later, he was pulled over by […]

Read More

Gleanings From The Past #54

Not Lost in Translation A ludicrous story is told of a great naval function which took place during the reign of the last Napoleon and the Empress Eugénie. Several American vessels were present, and they were drawn up in line to salute the Empress’s yacht as it passed. The French sailors, of course, manned the […]

Read More

Quotable #50: Gradualness

“Firstly, gradualness. About this most important condition of fruitful scientific work I never can speak without emotion. Gradualness, gradualness, and gradualness. From the very beginning of your work, school yourselves to severe gradualness in the accumulation of knowledge.” — Ivan Pavlov, his advice to the academic youth, Science, Vol. 83, April 17, 1936

Read More

Pun Of The Weak: Some Science Stuff

Biology — The science where multiplication and division have the same meaning. Chemistry — The science of interaction between people. Physics — A science that matters. Statistics — Where the truth lies. Astronomy — A science above your head. Bonus: Archeologist — Someone whose career lies in ruins — Anon. (read it in a newspaper […]

Read More

4 Sleep Myths That May Be Hurting Your Sleep

This is a guest post by Sarah Cummings As children, we were lead to believe that bedtime stories were A Good Thing. Which, more often than not, they were. They led us into some wonderful dreamscapes, filled with princesses, talking animals, and rainbow-colored streets. The better the story, the sounder the sleep. Of course, sometimes […]

Read More

A Way To Glowing Health

This is a guest post by Joe Malone While reading The World as I Found It by Bruce Duffy (1987), a novel about the social and philosophical interactions between Wittgenstein, Russell, and Moore, I came upon the following, referencing Bertrand Russell and the married woman he was carrying on an affair with, Lady Ottoline Morrell: Then […]

Read More

50 Random Fun Facts

1. Steve Wozniak, the co-founder of Apple, was the first owner of the phone number 888-888-8888. Unfortunately, he found it unusable since he received more than a hundred phone calls per day from kids playing with phones. 2. FORTY is the only number in the English language which letters are in alphabetical order. In Spanish, […]

Read More

Reversed Footprints: The Odd Inverted Shoes

On November 20, 1973, Cecil Slemp filed a patent for his invention — a footwear with heels and toe positions reversed — and he got the patent on July 16, 1976. The reversed soles of the shoes enable the wearer to leave inverted footprints. 

Read More

Quotable #28: Experts

“Even when the experts all agree, they may well be mistaken.” — Bertrand Russell, A Fresh Look at Empiricism: 1927-42 (Collected Papers), 1996

Read More

Outliving His Obituary Writer

James Van Allen Not many people can say that they outlived their obituary writer. However, in the case of physicist James Van Allen (1914-2006), he outlived his obituary writer by ten years. In 1996, science reporter Walter Sullivan (1918-1996) was tasked by the Associated Press to write an obituary of Van Allen to be published once he […]

Read More