The Big Universe

In his book, The Book of Naturalists (1944), naturalist William Beebe related an interesting anecdote about him and his friend Theodore Roosevelt during his visits to Sagamore Hill, Roosevelt’s residence. Roosevelt and Beebe would go out after an evening of talk and dinner and search the night sky until they locate the faint spot of light-mist […]

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Gleanings from the Past #89

Default The credit department of the Hudson’s Bay Co. received this letter from a Canadian farmer: “I got your letter about what I owe. Now be pachant. I ain’t forgot you. When I have the money I will pay you. If this was the Judgment Day and you was no more prepared to meet your […]

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An Einstein Legend

Legend has it that an apple falling from a tree and then subsequently hitting Isaac Newton on the head is said to have provided Newton the idea of the gravitational force. This is a well-known and often told legend in physics. There is a lesser-known legend that explains Einstein’s discovery of his theory of the […]

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3 Tips to Find the Right Chemistry App to Help You With Learning

This is a guest post by Camila Grace. If you are new to the chemistry world or a seasoned student, there are applications for each and everyone in between that can make learning easy and portable. But there is a lot out there so you do you know how to find the right app for […]

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Of Beauty and Truth

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich (left), Karl Heinrich Schellbach (right) Georg Wilhelm Friedrich (1770 – 1831), a notable German philosopher, once remarked, “Who does not know the works of the ancients dies without knowing beauty.” German mathematician Karl Heinrich Schellbach (1805 – 1892) responded, “Who does not know the works of mathematicians and scientists dies without knowing […]

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Gleanings from the Past #75

Coining New Words Carl Sagan Physicists had to invent words and phrases for concepts far removed from everyday experience. It was their fashion to avoid pure neologisms and instead to evoke, even if feebly, some analogous commonplace. The alternative was to name discoveries and equations after one another. This they did also. But if you […]

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Gleanings from the Past #74

A Broken Leg and Some Books (1874) H. G. Wells My leg was broken for me when I was between seven and eight. Probably I am alive to-day and writing this autobiography instead of being a worn-out, dismissed and already dead shop assistant, because my leg was broken. The agent of good fortune was “young […]

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Next Generation: Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning

This is a guest post by Ethan Gilmore About Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning As the name suggests, artificial intelligence is something artificial and exists contrary to the natural intelligence possessed by living beings.  Humans are greatly fascinated by the discovery of this branch of science that can make computers and robotics to think, learn, […]

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Robert Heinlein’s Predictions for the 21st Century

Science-fiction author Robert Heinlein wrote several predictions for the year 2000 and beyond in his article “Where To?” which was first published in the February 1952 edition of Galaxy Science Fiction: AXIOM: A “common sense” prediction is sure to err on the side of timidity […] AXIOM: The more extravagant a prediction sounds the more likely […]

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Gleanings from the Past #68

Spectrum Newton was probably responsible for the concept that there are seven primary colours in the spectrum—he had a strong interest in musical harmonies and, since there are seven distinct notes in the musical scale, he divided up the spectrum into spectral bands with widths corresponding to the ratios of the small whole numbers found […]

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