Which Man-Made Structures Around the 2orld Have the Best Views?

This is a guest post by David Laing. If you’re looking to impress your Instagram followers then the following bucket list of man-made structures will give you some breath-taking views … and amazing photos! Grab your camera and passport, and start snapping… Eiffel Tower, Paris The Eiffel Tower has become a cultural icon and is […]

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Gleanings from the Past #82

Wasted Time I wasted time, and now doth time waste me; For now hath time made me his numbering clock: My thoughts are minutes; and with sighs they jar Their watches on unto mine eyes, the outward watch, Whereto my finger, like a dial’s point, Is pointing still, in cleansing them from tears. Now sir, […]

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Oops: A Taxing Error

While browsing the news archive of United Press International (UPI), I came across an article published on November 18, 1993, which contained an amusing blunder. The article was about Dewi Sukarno, widow of Indonesia’s first president, receiving compensation from the Indonesian government: The government said Thursday it has paid a $2.85 million to Dewi Sukarno, […]

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A Postcard That Traversed Time and Space

In 1948, a mother from Spiceland, Indiana sent a postcard to her son. It took 58 years before her son received it. However, it was not as straightforward, as the town’s postmaster had to purchase it on eBay. Judy Dishman, Spiceland’s postmaster, was browsing on eBay while on vacation when she saw a postcard that […]

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Inscription on the Entrance of a Villa in Siena of Yore

  Siena, Italy Image: Equity Residences  Joseph Massarette’s book La Vie Martiale et Fastueuse de Pierre-Ernest de Mansfeld (1517-1604), which was published in 1930, told of a whimsical inscription on the entrance of a villa in Siena, Italy during the sixteenth century: Quisquis huc accedis, Quod tibi horrendum videtur, Mihi amœnum est, Si delectat manaes, […]

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War and Politics

Beilby Porteus In one of the many heated debates in the House of Peers regarding England’s participation in the French Revolution in 1794, a noble lord on the opposition quoted a portion of a poem about war written by Bishop Beilby Porteus (1731 – 1809): One murder makes a villain; Millions, a hero! Princes are […]

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Being Laconic Is Harder Than You Think

One time, the publisher of Mark Twain told him through telegram to write a short story: NEED 2-PAGE SHORT STORY TWO DAYS Twain wired back with this: NO CAN DO 2 PAGES TWO DAYS. CAN DO 30 PAGES 2 DAYS. NEED 30 DAYS TO DO 2 PAGES. “I… never could make a good impromptu speech,” […]

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8-Step Process to Establish Your Business with WordPress Web Development

This is a guest post by Shailendra Girish Kadulkar. Online businesses are no more a new concept to discuss. There are already a great number of websites carrying out business activities with complete interest and remarkable progress. The fact that you’re surfing across the content indicates clearly that you have decided to leap through the […]

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Checks Written in Blood

Charles K. Feldman (left) and Alexander Korda (right) Film producer Charles K. Feldman (1905 – 1968) related this story: I lost at gin rummy with Alexander Korda one evening, and mailed him a check next day. It was written in red ink, and accompanied by this note: “Dear Alex: You will see that this check is written in […]

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The Reason Dostoevsky Preferred to Work at Night

Russian novelist Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821 – 1888) usually liked to work through the night. With tea, cigarettes, and sweets as fuel, he could pull several all-nighters to write his novels. He told a friend through a letter why he preferred to do his business at night: It is night now; the hands of the clock […]

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