Tag Archives: Writing

Gleanings From The Past #50

Some Poem Extracts Children dear, was it yesterday We heard the sweet bells over the bay? In the caverns where we lay, Through the surf and through the swell, The far-off sound of a silver bell? Sand-strewn caverns, cool and … Continue reading

Posted in Language, Poetry | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

20 Thought-Provoking Quotes About Reading And Thinking

“He might be a very clever man by nature, for all I know, but he laid so many books upon his head that his brains could not move.” — Robert Hall, when asked whether he thought that Dr. Kippis was … Continue reading

Posted in Quotations | Tagged , , , , , | 21 Comments

The Economist’s Blunder

Geoffrey K. Pullum On March 20, 1997, linguist Geoffrey K. Pullum sent the following letter to The Economist in response to the article regarding the Russian oil pipeline problems the newspaper published a week prior: Sir: “Connections needed” (March 15) … Continue reading

Posted in Language | Tagged , , , , | 8 Comments

Obsolete Geographical Knowledge

“You mean there are two Koreas?” — U.S. Ambassador to Singapore Richard Kneip, when questioned about his opinion during a congressional hearing on the conflict between the North and South Korea. Doctor, a newspaper targeted to general practitioners published once … Continue reading

Posted in History, Trivia | Tagged , , , , , | 16 Comments

Gleanings From The Past #49

Procrastination To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in this petty pace, from day to day, To the last syllable of recorded time! And all our yesterdays have lighted fools The way to dusty death. — William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act 5, … Continue reading

Posted in Humor, Literature | Tagged , , , , , | 10 Comments

Dream Of A Spelling-Bee

During the latter part of the nineteenth century, Spelling Bee competitions became popular in England. Punch magazine had several prose and illustrations which referenced this fad. One of them is the following nonsense verse titled “Dream of a Spelling-Bee” which the magazine … Continue reading

Posted in Language, Poetry | Tagged , , , | 12 Comments

A Riddle From Isaac Newton?

Horace Walpole (1717-1797) sent the following riddle to Lady Ossory, claiming that it was composed by physicist and mathematician Isaac Newton: Four people sat down at a table to play; They play’d all that night, and some part of next … Continue reading

Posted in Poetry, Puzzles | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments