A Secured House

Image: “Modern bust of Catullus on the Piazza Carducci in Sirmione”, Wikimedia The following epigram illustrates an amusing play on words. It was written by Gaius Valerius Catullus (c. 84 BC – c. 54 BC), a Roman poet during the late Roman Republic, and was translated by Theodore Martin from Latin in The Poems of Catullus, 1861. […]

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How to Switch Back to the WordPress Classic Editor

A few days ago, WordPress 5.0 was finally launched and together with it, was the new WordPress editor called “Gutenberg”. though it could already be tested a while ago. While the editor received several good reviews and praises from a number of tech sites, I personally find it lacking. I have used this new editor […]

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Some Blog-Related Updates

I’m in the process of cleaning up my blog and I just realized the amount of work waiting to be done. Previously, I have been using a “first letter” format for my titles, that is, every first letter of every word in the title is capitalized. However, I now find this format atrocious to look […]

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Pun Of The Weak: Broken English

Thomas Hood Thomas Hood, a 19th-century author and poet, once related a story about an editor of a new morning newspaper asking an Alderman what he thought of his paper. “I like it a lot,” the Alderman replied, “though it contains several broken English.” The editor was confused so he told him to elaborate. “Why […]

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Lines On A Twister

The following tongue twister is found in Samuel Johnson’s seminal book A Dictionary of the English Language, first published in 1755, under the definition of TWISTER: When a twister a-twisting will twist him a twist, For the twisting of his twist, he three twines doth intwist; But if one of the twines of the twist […]

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Gleanings From The Past #66

We Regret the Error An Irish editor, apologizing for a rather serious blunder in his paper, said: “I never saw the manuscript till it was in print.” — The St Louis Republic [St. Louis, Missouri], April 28, 19011  The Will of a Virtuoso I, NICHOLAS GIMCRACK, being in sound health of mind, but in great weakness […]

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Gleanings From The Past #65

Yankee Doodle A writer in Harper’s Magazine for the current month, seems to find his Dutch blood dancing to a new tune in the delight he experiences at a discovery, in recent researches into American literature, concerning the much-disputed origin of Yankee Doodle. Of course we cannot find it in our hearts to criticise the […]

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A Very Grateful Passenger

The following is a quaint and rather amusing letter received by a general manager of a motor omnibus company located in the “north of the Trent”. It was penned by an anonymous passenger who wrote “The Royal Infirmary” as the return address:

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I Finally Found Out Where Those Spams Are Coming From

Spams are annoying, and unfortunately, I have no choice but to deal with them. My blog has been bombarded by spams since the day I gained some readers. As time goes by, it became worse. For instance, I just cleared my spam folder last Sunday and now, it has more than 200 blocked comments. So, […]

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A One Syllable Per Line Sonnet

The following is an remarkable short “sonnet” titled “An Aeronaut to his Lady” composed by Frank Sidgwick (1879-1939) quoted in David McCord (Editor), What Cheer: An Anthology of American and British Humorous and Witty Verse, 1945: I Through Blue Sky Fly To You. Why? Sweet Love, Feet Move So Slow! This sonnet differs from traditional […]

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